it’s only money, honey

 

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Excerpt below from an article by Tim Maurer, sent to me, interestingly, by my husband. Go figure. Full piece available at Forbes.

 

“Money destroys relationships because people can’t compete with money. Money, after all, doesn’t disappoint you, or express disappointment with you.

Money doesn’t remind us of our shortcomings and doesn’t appear to have any.

Money appears to promise to deliver all of our hopes and dreams. If only we just had more, all of our problems would disappear. All of our goals could be met.

It’s not that money is inherently bad or evil, but it’s not inherently good or righteous either. Money is simply a neutral tool that can be used well or poorly. It only has the value—the personality and the relational standing—that we give it.

One of the few criticisms I have of the movement to explore the psychology of money is its use of the phrase “your relationship with money.” Unintentionally, this gives money entirely too much credit by implying personhood. Indeed, if you have a “relationship” with money, you’re likely elevating it unnecessarily, and maybe even subconsciously devaluing those in your life who actually have a heartbeat.

How did we get here, to the point where we’ve personified—and in some cases deified—the “almighty” dollar? Yes, I’m sure it’s due to our culture of consumerism, the perpetual marketing machine, but I primarily blame institutions of which I am a part: the financial industry and the business that has grown up around consumer personal finance experts. In these realms, money has been made the goal or end, when in reality it is only the vehicle or means.”

 

photo credit: gmhslancerledger.com

 

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